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leak in history. prosecutors made their closing arguments on thursday and the defense followed on friday. he is the first-ever defendant to face and aiding the enemy charge for leaking more than 700,000 documents to wikileaks and other news agencies, and could case -- said a major precedent. the judge in the case is now deliberating over the 21 charges manning faces and has not said when she will rule. many of manning's supporters are dismissal of a possible guilty finding and to reduce the whistleblower sentence. on friday, whistleblowers block the gates of fort mcnair in washington, where offices are located. is not whether or not he was naive. >> the idea that he is being punished for coming out against war crimes and cruelty by his fellow servicemen is really disturbing. >> over the weekend, protesters around the world also held rallies to mark in international day of action calling for manning's release. for more, we are joined from fort meade, via video stream, with alexa o'brien. she is in her car outside the courtroom. she was the first to make transcripts of the procee
of the big activities was the defense spending bill. what is the headlines coming out of that discussion? guest: the headline has to do with the national security agency. it was a very close vote. it shows how divided the house -200epresentatives, 217 five, to keep allowing the nsa to collect telephone records. host: explain it to those that are not following it closely. many: i don't imagine too people do not understand it. this is the national security agency that was found to be collecting phone calls. they are randomly collecting phone calls under court orders from a secret court. certainly a lot of people do not want to be listened to. this was all covered by edward snowden, now sitting in the moscow airport. to stop a vote to try this practice, which was authorized by congress as part of the patriot act after 9/11. host: the amendment did not survive? guest: it did not survive. it does not explain how that would happen. host: who supported this amendment and who opposed it? we saw a lot of things that you probably did not see before. we have liberal democrats who did not like the g
of defense and the secretaries of all of the armed forces groups, got together to honor the veterans of the korean war. it was a sight to see so many korean veterans from so many different parts of the country. and they were reminded by our president that we had been labeled as those who participated in what was referred to as the forgotten war. because most all of the world knew about the importance of america being involved in saving emocracy in world war ii and vietnam. good or bad, people knew people that went there. but somehow in the middle of that, no one really missed us or knew where korea was or didn't appear that there was too much concern. d when we did return, unlike the vietnam veterans who really unfairly had been treated so unkind, fortunately for us, we were never missed except by our family and friends, people never they here we were and to us. weren't as kind veterans turned out from all over. comrades that were part of the 20 countries that were part of the united nations. and when north koreans invaded south korea, those of us who were called to go to south korea
. >> laura: joining us now from w. reaction two criminal defense attorneys from new york stacy snyder and from davey, florida, regina tombinascus. it's great to see both of you. that got everybody talking yesterday that's for sure this juror speaking out. regina, let's talk with you. we heard from that other juror b-37 who she thought both men could have stepped back. that both were responsible but that she believed that zimmerman had a right to defend himself. now this juror comes forward and says zimmerman got away with, quote: murder, but then goes on to say we reached the right verdict. can you say get away with murder and reached the right verdict? >> yes, you can actually, because there is no question that trayvon was killed by george zimmerman. the issue was whether or not it was self-defense or not. and these jurors had that question posed to them. they had the law. fanned they thought there was nord reasonable doubt there this was murder they should have spoken up in the jury room. not weeks later after media attacks their. system we agree to live by. >> laura: i don't like t
working with the prosecution and stonewalling the defense. this is really just a whitewash and it's disappointing, and frankly, makes me furious. filedon's attorneys have a motion saying that they were denied exculpatory evidence. student new lost his life after being handcuffed in a cell for four days without food or water. daniel john had been arrested at a celebration for marijuana culture. he was due to be released, but the dea and his agents forgot about him after placing him in a holding cell. he said he could see -- here's staffers outside of his cell, but no one answered his pleas for help. he drank his own urine in a bid to survive. none of the agents involved will face charges. six activists with a group codepink were arrested inside the senate are building on tuesday for protests calling for the closure of guantanamo bay. three demonstrators are on their long-term hunger strike in solidarity with guantanamo prisoners. those are some of the headlines. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. welcome to our listeners and viewers around the count
killer but also a pedophile. the former prosecutor, criminal defense attorney and some real characters that we're all being introduced to in this trial. dan, you first. i'm wondering about the testimony from the so-called rifleman. how damaging is that do you think to the defense? >> in terms of the actual charges that whitey bulger is facing, it's not that damaging. murder charges are going to be proved. there's overwhelming evidence. however, this case is unusual. it seems like the defense is more focused on stopping the prosecution from proving things that ruin his reputation like he's a rat or kills women or he's a pedophile and in that sense, that means a lot to the defense. in terms of whether he'll be convicted of murder, it probably won't make a difference. rick: what do you think of that point, the defense strategy here? could this be some kind of a preventative strategy before this guy goes to prison? >> definitely. i think they've had the conversation and bulger has told his attorneys, look. i'm going down. i know i'm going to prison but i at least need to be protected. i ca
, let me get to you react to what mark o'mara, the defense attorney for george zimmerman posted a little while ago, while juror b-29 is a model juror. "people may disagree with self-defense laws but a juror's job is not to decide what a law should be, her job is to apply the facts presented at trial to the laws they are instructed about. this is the eence of what we seek in a juror, the at to use one as common sense, apply the law to the facts, agree not to be swayed by sympathy or emotion, no matter how loudly it's argued by the prosecutors and decide a lawful and fair verdict." do you agree that juror b-29 was a, quote, model juror? >> well, i don't know if she was a model juror or not. i certainly think that she approached the process in good faith. i don't think there's any reason to doubt that she did that. but i think jeffrey makes a good point. what is really clear when we hear this juror speak is that she really misunderstood the law. she did not appropriately apply the law to the facts because she didn't understand it. and the reason why she didn't understand it could be because
by political asylum. there is a complete defense for whistle blowers to criminality. think about it. the people who expose the milan massac massacre, should they have been prosecuted. auschwitz, should that person have been prosecuted? >> david, i'd love to get your thoughts on this. the debate over whether or not lives have been harmed is still very a raging debate. a lot of people would argue the other side of that. >> one thing that bradley manning did was he didn't leak documents on a given one of these things, you know, that michael just went through was a major dump that had what some people depending where they sit, good leaks and bad leaks. to me, it's very troubling that he would be prosecuted under the espionage act even though he was let off on the aiding and abetting the enemy, which i thought was ridiculous, is this really espionage. if you look at the washington post, they have a great chart this morning, 20 odd different counts. michael i'm sure is familiar with all of them. only a few espionage. there were others about leaking classified information, violating regulations, thing
, and he acts in self-defense, that's incredible bad luck he found himself in that situation twice. but we'll sleep soundly. >> you would sleep soundly if you did it again? >> if he's acting legally in self-defense again, absolutely. >> and at what point does he have to take responsibility for pursuing, some would sigh stalking unarmed teenagers who are walking home? >> again, two different levels of government review have found no fault with mr. zimmerman's actions. >> i'm asking you if you do. if you think at any point he has any responsibility for his own actions? in other words, if you're going to arm this guy again, give him a gun that he's recently used to shoot an unarmed teenager. if you're going to arm him again, and that's what you've actively done. you've raised $12,000 to arm him with guns, ammunitions, security and so on, that's fine. what if he does it again? >> well, i mean, we can go through all the hypotheticals you'd like to go through, what it comes down to is that he's gone through a government review again in the second hypothetical situation that you're raising, then
: we are just hours away from a sentencing hearing, on wednesday morning, where defense and prosecutors will argue of over what is an appropriate sentence. the judge could decide to let the charges run concurrently or string them out, and come up with a number of years that manning will serve. erin? >> that number of years so important. thank you very much, chris. >>> republican congressman peter king, a member of the house homeland security committee and the house intelligence committee. good to see you, sir, as always. >> thank you. >> are you happy, dispointed? what word would you use? >> i'm gratified that he was convicted on five counts of espionage, plus the other theft counts. this is a serious, serious crime. and five counts, that should have a very, very significant prison sentence and hopefully it will be deterrent to other people such as bradley manning or edward snowden, that type of individual that blooechls they can disclose national secrets. >> so, the essentisentencinsent this court-martial is going to start tomorrow. he could get up to 136 years. what is the appropriate
you pay for it comes to sunscreen. up next, it was a cold-blooded murder or self-defense. another florida shooting case heads to court. this time police say man killed a teenager over loud music. details on this story right ahead. "i'm part of an american success story," "that starts with one of the world's most advanced distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart" plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. >>> two weeks after the george zimmerman verdict, another case is making headlines. a man who shot and killed a 17-year-old in a convenience store parking lot insist
could be together. newman was charged with the murder and part of his defense centered on the claim that andrea snyderman was actively involved in planning the whole thing. she testified at newman's trial explaining why she was in florida at the time of the murder and denying any role. >> we were married in florida at a synagogue in florida. i was down there with my family. whose boss kills swunl's husband? i don't care if there were no affair. there was no affair. who kills someone else's husband? >> newman was convicted and sure enough, six months later, andrea snyderman was charged in connection with the murder of her husband. jury selection is underway right now, but in a surprise move, the prosecutors asking the judge to drop the most serious murder charge. essentially admitting they don't have the evidence to back it up. instead, she now faces a bunch of lesser charges, including lying to police and lying while on that witness stand. rusty snyderman's family very upset the murder charge was dropped since they say all along, they've been sure she played some kind of a role. mea
in the korean war. we expect that defense secretary chuck hagel is also going to be attending and participating in this. you are listening to "taps." honoring those that served in the war and the president will go ahead and lay a wreath. that wreath laying ceremony. listen. ♪ we will go back when he hear the president making those remarks. a touching moment there. >> beautiful to hear that. >>> let's talk about edward snowden. new developments in the case of the nsa leaker. edward snowden will not face the death penalty. he won't be tortured. that is about all the u.s. is promising, however, as it is going to try to persuade russia to hand over the notorious nsa leaker. we heard from attorney general eric holder. he wrote a letter saying earlier in the week the charges he faces do not carry that possibility. the united states would not seek the death penalty even if mr. snowden were charged with additional death penalty eligible crimes. >> jill dougherties that latest in the efforts to get snowden back to the united states. >> family, home in paradise. i lived in great comfort. >> reporter: t
his head into the concrete, and he acts in self-defense, that's incredible bad luck he found himself in that situation twice, but we'll sleep soundly. >> i mean, he will sleep very soundly but when i asked him have you thought about providing help to trayvon martin's family so they can defend themselves, he didn't really have an answer for me. >> i watched the interview last night, and having been a homicide prosecutor here in new york, i can tell you i've sat across from and interviewed people who were store owners, as well as police officers who had to use their firearm and take a life, and if it's in self-defense and they were not -- they were found not to be liable for that death, it was not a murder, it was a killing, as in this situation here, i -- i can tell you for certain those people were affected in ways that stayed with them forever. a police officer who takes the life of a young teenage boy, the first thing he would want to do is not grab a gun. that's not the kind of person that goes back to the core values i was talking about. a real law enforcement officer, somebody t
not require intent. and she never addresses self-defense. that was such a focal point in the case, not only for the defense, also for the prosecution. they had the burden to prove beyond a reasonable doubt there was not self-defense. >> lisa, what do you think? >> i think there's no question that george zimmerman shot trayvon martin intention ally. he according to his own statements pulled out the gun and shot the gun intentionally. it's so disturbing to hear a juror speak after the fact that perhaps she should have held out when she had every opportunity in the jury room to voice how she felt and stand her ground and ultimately she chose not to. >> she's chose not to. mash, go ahead. when you heard this woman explain her rational, what did you think? >> the parties that i'm extracting from it i want to compliment about. trials are not moral try b-- tribunals in the united states. it happens every day in american jurisprudence. people may be everything from child molesters to murderers and robbers and everything in between but you have to apply the fact, you have to apply the evidence to th
of eisenhower, bush. i mean, we are a party of national defense. we're a party who did so much to protect the country over the last 12 years. >> where's the real republican party? which one of those? where's the real republican party? >> i think we're going to find that out over the next three years. i want the republican party to be a party of strong national defense and a party who, for instance, can reach out to labor unions, construction unions, police officers, firefighters -- these are people who are socially conservative and want to agree with us, and so many people in our party drive them away. to me, the overriding concern has to be national defense, national security, and not be apologizing for america. when you have rand paul actually comparing snowden to martin luther king or henry david thoreau, this is madness, this is the anti-war democrats in the 1960s that destroyed their party for almost 15 years. i don't want that happening to our party. >> there have been two statements made by republicans. one is that, if congress does not pass some kind of major immigration reform, i
furloughed. who's going to man veterans hospitals? who's going to make sure defense work gets done? who's going to take care of indian reservation health care and schools? i mean that's -- those are federal responsibilities and shutting down the government for a goal that you can't achieve that way is just counterproductive. >> what do you think of the reporting that we're getting saying that republicans intend on using the august recess to pressure reluctant lawmakers on this strategy? i mean i guess as a republican, how devastating, how destructive in this infighting for the party on the whole? >> oh, i never mind debates. look, i think that's part of what politics is about and people advance ideas. again, remember, this is a difference over tab tix, not objectives. none of us are supporting obama care. in that sense i think we take our eye off the ball and if you again adopt a strategy that can't work -- this one just simply will not work -- you falsely raise the hoech your own supporters that it might succeed and you're going to be pretty devastated when you fail. so again this is j
in defense of the united states and sworn to do and respect certain things. i think it's very appropriate that the trial was handled in the military court system. >> rose: you seem to have some sympathy-- not sympathy, but you seem to have some understanding-- he's a troubled young man, you said about bradley manning. what do you think about edward snowden? >> i also think this is a troubled young man who kind of embraced an absolute commitment to transparency. he's made some very bad decisions. i don't know that he fully understands how much harm he has done. but, charlie, let me explain why i think these two cases-- manning and snowden-- are so very important. i mean, these two young men are representatives of a generation that the american security services-- c.i.a., n.s.a., and others-- that's generation from which we are now recruiting most of our talent and particularly our cybir talent. now, i understand the folks in that generation have a different-- a different balance point between secrecy and transparency than our generation did, charlie. but this generation has to be shown tha
in a strong national defense, how do you have enough funding? i'm willing to cut entire departments. my problem with some of the more liberal members of the republican party is, they're not willing to cut spending other places in order to preserve national defense. >> joining me now is robert george, editorial writer for new york post, josh barrel and tim carnie, senior political columnist for the washington examiner. visiting fellow at the enterprise institute. you're team paul in this one, i take it? what do you think -- why do you think this is a good fight for the republicans to have? i sense you do think it is. and why is paul the one that you're backing, that you feel speaks for the party the best. >> first let me say i do not accept rand paul's premise that eating bacon makes you gain weights, i think it's the carbs. in the foreign policy realm, what we need and in the national security realm, as far as nsa, spying and the great stuff that you and glenn were talking about earlier, what we need is a robust debate and there hasn't been that in the republican party for a long time.
whitey bulger. the defense will open its case on monday. jim armstrong has the story. >> reporter: the government ended its case on two powerful witnesses, one, what was known as massive money laundering and the other an irs agent who arrested him. he co--owned a bank account with his brother that was used to collect on big south boston debt long after whitey went on the run. after that jurors got to see everything pulled out of bulger's apartment turned hideout in santa monica california. more than $822,000 in cash hidden in walls alongside 30 pistols, rifles and other weapons. the witness testified he screamed and swore when arrested but eventually calmed down and told katherine to say, yes and, they're going get it. he used his real name joking quote, this is the first time i've signed this name in a long time. when agent gary hola asked if he would have ever used this arsenal to engage in a shoot-out with police, he said no because a stray bullet might hit someone. it was a powerful day of testimony and images but some are not confident of a conviction
that's been problematic from the case is the defense defines george zimmerman in a way that was helpful to his defense, but i don't think they feel as though their son has been well defined and sort of who he was. >> reporter: the back and forth over the martin case went to new heights after president obama himself weighed in with a deeply personal speech. >> when trayvon martin was first shot, i said that this could have been my son. another way of saying that is trayvon martin could have been me 35 years ago. >> all eyes are on the attorney general eric holder. the obama constituency wants to know whether they'll take any further steps in the case. >> by allowing and perhaps encouraging violent situations to escalate in public, such laws undermine public safety. the list of results tragedies is long and unfortunately has victimized too many who are innocent. it is our collective obligation. we must stand our ground. >> the martin family has started a foundation to honor trayvon's memory and to push for changes. >> we're here today to see what we can do to stop this from happening to y
or what the defense said. as far as whether private manning is traitor, that should not be band aided back. it has a unique stigma to it. unless someone is going to prosecute him for treason he shouldn't be labeled a traitor. i think the claim he's a whistle blower is off based. he may have had what he considers good intentions but at the end of the day it's not especially to every citizen to decide whether to share the count country's crown jewels with others. >> that raises the question. barbara, i don't know you've done a lot of reporting. 750,000 pages were handed over to wikileakss and a lot of that posted on the internet. a lot of it was classifieied secret. it waunt higher classification. based on everything you've heard, how much real damage to u.s. national security was done as a result of this? >> this has been the debate all along and continues to be the debate in the snowden case. how much damage? people will tell you that bradley manning leaked a lot of information but it was information intelligence at a point in time. something that happened in iraq. something that happened
to inexpect your glove compartment. >> zimmerman hasn't been in contact with his defense team. david mattingly covered the trial. what was george zimmerman doing in texas? >> we talked to people closest to him and they are not saying at all. they are pointing out security reasons for that. we got a statement from his family a short time ago and it reads our family received death threats on a daily basis. we continue to take our security and privacy very seriously and go to great lengths to ensure our safety and that includes not talking to people about where george zimmerman is. we also received a tweet from his defense team talking about this saying we won't make comments about zimmerman's whereabouts. zimmerman himself was somewhat vague today in talking to the police officer. you can hear some of that exchange on the police video. the officer asked him where he was headed to and zimmerman would not give him a firm answer. security clearly on everyone's mind here for george zimmerman's whereabouts. >> a lot of people obviously as you say might be shocked to know george zimmerman is traveling
them down. >> joining me now, b.e.t. columnist and cnbc contributor keith boykin and criminal defense attorney john burris. keith, i want to start with you. let's play part of that interview that everybody's talking about today. here's some of that. >> george zimmerman got away with murder, but you can't get away from god. and at the end of the day, he's going to have a lot of questions and answers he has to deal with. the law couldn't prove it. we just have to believe in the lord, that he's -- if he has to pay, he will pay. >> now, of course, you have to make a point that juror b-29 and her other jurors found george zimmerman not guilty of second-degree murder. that said, were you surprised to see her come forward and make such an admission? >> i was surprised to see her come forward. i was surprised to see her show her face and to give out part of a name. it seems to me she clearly did not understand the law. i don't know if that was the fault of the judge or the fault of the prosecutor in terms of explaining the law to her. but the jury instructions specifically said in order to pr
to go with this last line of defense of just before somebody gets on that aircraft, are we going to start screening them, and there's always a chance they're going to miss something. i think we should be investing more in who's buying the tickets, who were the bad folks out there and let's invest more on the intelligence side rather than the last second trying to catch 'em side. >> there is this pre-check thing. are you involved with that? >> yes. >> i have that. i don't know how i got it but i'm pre-checked so i don't have to take my shoes off and i don't have to take stuff out of my bag and all that. i don't know why i don't have to. i don't understand why, how that works or why i'm less of a danger than anybody else because i feel dangerous. >> well you must be a favorite of tsa already, shep. >> i'm sure i am, very supportive. >> tsa is going to roll out a program in the fall about tsa act t simplifies things tremendously. the line you're going in is shorter, you don't have to take off your shoes, moves more efficiently so definitely try and get in there if you can. >> it's a
information to the website wikileaks. the founder julian assange came to his defense. >> it will mean the end of national security journalism in the united states as we know it if it is left to stand. >> he is talking about getting behind an appeal of this. prosecutors will be presenting evidence today on just how much damage manning's leaks caused the u.s. government. that could play into how much time he'll serve. we will have more on this story coming up a little later in this hour. for his small business. take these bags to room 12 please. [ garth ] bjorn's small business earns double miles on every purchase every day. produce delivery. [ bjorn ] just put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? ahh, oh! [ garth ] great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. here's your wake up call. [ male announcer ] get the spark business card from capital one and earn unlimited rewards. choose double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase every day. what's in your wallet? [ crows ] now where's the snooze button? to take skincare to the next level you're ready for roc® new roc® multi corre
enrollment fees the house armed services committee, of which i'm a member, and other defense committees have declined to grant the authority for these fee increases. my amendment would do nothing more than ensure that the fund in this fact are not made available to implement any new enrollment fees in the tricare for life program. year after year we hear from the defense department that health care costs of our soldiers and veterans are spiraling out of control and tricare is crippling the d.o.d. with its rising costs yet for the past two dwhreerks pentagon has found a way to reprogram hundreds of millions of dollars from defense health accounts to higher priorities. these reprogramming actions totaled $70 million last career in 2012, and $500 million in the -- in the prior year in 2011. explained that the surplus was due to uncertainty about medical installation and health care use and the impact of continual benefit changes and efficiency initiatives. if there is uncertainty about costs, the assertion cannot be made that added fees are necessary for even our most senior veterans. d.o.d.'s
and disadvantaged. and it's hoped such a message may prove more attractive than the defensiveness that prevailed in the wake of repeated vatican scandals, both financial and sexual. in rio, we found new yorker ariana drauch who credited the pope with re-energizing the faithful. >> i think the pope has a great head on his shoulders and he definitely -- he knows what he's talking about. >> reporter: dean reynolds de janeiro, cbs news. >>> time now for headlines. for that to happen the stock would have to trip until value. >> "the washington post" says the cia is winding down operations in afghanistan. the spy agency plans to cut the number of its clandestine bases in afghanistan in half. >> the "los angeles times" look at apple third quarter earnings. the company beat predictions. also set a record for the number of iphones sold. the news sent shares higher in after hours trading. >> "the boston globe" said a grand jury is hearing emd on whether aaron hernandez should be charged in the shooting death of two men in 2012. he is due in court today for the murder of another man
a case that they are going to go forward with and it is going to be very difficult for the defense to counter that. of course, the way the defense always corrects that is to say hey, listen, you got a deal. you are really the bad guy. you made a deal in order to exculpate yourself from some kind of criminal responsibility, criminal liability. this case is very early now. this is moving very quickly. there is going to be a lot of procedural process that happens. this grand jury indictment probably is going to move the case right to trial. but i wouldn't expect to see a trial in this case for many months to come. >> ortiz is particularly interesting in this case because he is the co-defendant that's come forward and said that another co-defendant involved actually told him hernandez is the individual that actually shot the gun and killed odin llyod. his testimony will be particularly crucial in this case. you could see him coming forward and testifying in the hearing. hearsay is allowed. >> we will have to wait ask see what happens. thank you. we will discuss other legal cases later
to the united states of america. >> and we have just learned that the amendment to the defense authorization bill proposed by republican congressman justin amash of michigan that would have essentially defunded the nsa and its surveillance program. programs that snowden had revealed, it just failed to pass the house of representatives, 217 to 205. shepard? >> shepard: jennifer griffin at the pentagon tonight. the former football great accused of murder returned to court today as we track multiple new developments in his case. prosecutors say the former new england patriots tight end aaron hernandez gunned down a friend of his last month. he has already pleaded not guilty. and just minutes before today's court appearance, the patriot's coach bill belichick made his first public comments on this case. he expressed sympathy for the family of the man who died. and belichick talked about the moment he first heard about it all. >> i and other members of the organization were shocked and disappointed in what we had learned. having someone in your organization that's involved in a murder investigati
in a minute. here's my general question. should the united states be primarily concerned with its own defense? do we have to be careful we don't get invaded and two days later say somebody says if we'd only done one thing because we're concerned about civil liberties. >> if you come out what looks to be an argument and you didn't use that power, you're dead politically in this country if you get attacked. >> chris, i worked 20 feet from the oval office for years and i saw the president the national security team grapple with a very real threat of attack. and the tools that are there that the nsa provided were important in thwarting some of those attacks. if we hadn't done it, then we would indeed have had more catastrophic kinds of attacks. i think people would have been outraged about it we have to be careful how we do that, and what the president suggested is that's why we have to have the involvement of all three branches of government. the answer is not to scrap the intelligence gathering that has demonstrably helped keep the american people safer. >> i don't like this. >> trisha: i'm not
and will not face the death penalty. and in what may be the most dramatic proceedings, the defense began presenting witnesses in the priel of whitey bulger today. they're looking to convict on gambling, extortion, drug trafficking, and 19, yes, 19 murder charges. a question on everyone's mind is, will whitey testify? he has apparently told a friend he wants to set the record straight. joining us are the captains of our legal team, attorney seema ayer, and former prosecutor patrick murphy. thanks for being here. seema, i want to start with the whitey bulger case and that question. do you expect him to testify? overall, what's the defense's strategy? >> krystal, dear, i hope not. hasn't he said enough? any time we've seen that man in court, he's basically getting bleeped for cursing. so can you just imagine what he's going to say? >> it would be great tv. >> of course, of course. that's why we're here. however, at this point president defense has done enough to set up some sort of reasonable doubt in this case. if he testifies like within every other case, state or federal, in this country, when a de
line of defense against rand paul's give me, give me, give me nonsense. i was so wrong. not about the dollars and cents. but about chris christie. he went there today. >> senator paul wants to start looking at where he is going to cut spending to afford defense? maybe he should start to cut the pork barrel defense he sends home to kentucky at $1.51 for every dollars and not look at new jersey where we get 61 cents per dollar, maybe he should look at that before he looks at the federal side. because most washington politicians only care about bringing home the bacon. >> and rand paul foolishly talked about bacon. >> this is the king of bacon, we have two military bases in kentucky. and is governor chris christie recommending we shut down the military bases? he wants to be this great champion of the military? what does he want to do, shut down the military bases? he is making a big mistake fighting with the republicans, because the republican party is shrinking there on the east coast, attacking me is not helping the party, he is hurting the party. >> two military bases in kentucky,
. we do really think that the federal government, it's first priority is defense of this nation. most people think this sequester is not good for our military. how can we substitute some other spending cuts in lower priority areas so we can reinterject those dollars into the military so we don't hollow out our military. >> speaking of common ground, yesterday, the president laid out what the white house is calling a new grand barring gab well as investing in infrastructure and jobs. you have supported some of those things in the past. where do you come down on his plan? >> he's got a framework out there so we'll have to see the details. he's acknowledging we have problems. we have an uncompetitive corporate tax rate that is really stymieing investment. really disincentivizing investment into jobs and business expansion here. we've got at least 1 trillion$1 if not 2trillion of corporate income basically parked overseas. our interstate highway system, we've seen bridges collapse, so we probably do need to spend money on infrastructure. the president got his package that was supposed to
no. >> i think it's important for the defense of our country. >> reporter: lawmakers who serve on the intelligence committees have known about the scope of the surveillance programs for years and many are strongly defending them. maryland democrat dutch runnersberger says it's vital too catching terrorists. >> i definitely feel the amendment would hurt our national security and subject us to terrorist attacks. >> reporter: the white house is also urging lawmakers to vote no on the amendment saying it would dismantle the nation's intelligence community. on capitol hill, danielle nottingham, kpix 5. >> the white house has asked russian authorities for clarity on snowden's status. the administration wants snowden back in the u.s. to face espionage charges. >>> former congressman anthony weiner is back on the campaign trail a day after he apologized for his latest "sexting" scandal. reporters swarmed him as he stepped out of his apartment a few hours ago. the "new york times" and the "daily news" are calling on him to drop out of the race. he has now acknowledged that he continued
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